Where is She Now?

Were you a participant in J4J? Did you send a tape or attend a screening?
Please share your memories with us. Select the link that best applies to you:
Participant »
Supporter/Viewer »

Just think about the lotus flower that in asian traditions represents divine beauty and purity, or, to use a more recent example, academic writing help the red poppy the analysis here that is a symbol of remembrance of the fallen soldiers of world war I in commonwealth nations

Chainletter Filmmakers:

The Banana Cremeletter

Irene Yung, Photo Synthesis
October 2, 2016

How did you find out about Joanie 4 Jackie and how old were you at the time?
I went to a performance art piece by Miranda at the Middle East, I think it was, in Central Square in Cambridge around 1999/2000. I think she talked about it then. It’s been so long I can’t remember exactly. I was around 23.

What interested you about the project?
I loved that it was all women filmmakers and was excited to see other women’s work and have them see mine. I’ve always loved letters and at the time was involved in a true circle letter exchange with a few of my college friends.

At the time you participated in Joanie 4 Jackie did you consider yourself a filmmaker? What was your relationship to making movies?
I did not. I had made the short as my final project for video production college class and loved the process but didn’t identify as a filmmaker.

Do you have any specific anecdotes or memories associated with your movie?
I cast my two older sisters as the main roles and didn’t tell them the project was my final and that it was due in a few days–we filmed over thanksgiving break–because I didn’t want them to worry that I had procrastinated so long or be (more) nervous on camera.

What did you think/feel about the Joanie 4 Jackie at the time? And now, in retrospect?
I thought it was great and so amazing to be taken seriously as a participant by such an amazing thoughtful artist. I was hoping for more feedback but now that I’m older I see that she was dealing with so many people. I could have reached out but I didn’t. My own lack of confidence led to greater isolation when there was ample opportunity. It was great to be a part of.

What institutions, groups, people, publications and movements were inspiring you at the time of your participation in J4J?
Wellesley College, bitch magazine, NYC Mayors Office for Film and TV, Sleater-Kinney

What do you do now – professionally and otherwise? Are you still involved in filmmaking?
After a decade of not working in the film industry, I’ve returned to it for the past three years. I’ve been producing and directing, writing, doing some commercial/corporate stuff. A couple of personal projects. The timing of this could not be better as I’m just starting to identify as a filmmaker. This reminds me how much I’ve always loved it.

In fact, pay for essay https://essaydragon.com the retention rate is over 100% as an extra person has joined

Mirka Morales, Goiter Girl
March 29, 2013

How did you find out about Joanie 4 Jackie and how old were you at the time?
I had been out of film school for a few years, working terrible jobs, trying to pay off my student loans. One of my dearest teachers from Cal Arts, experimental filmmaker Betzy Bromberg, had a screening in San Francisco, where I live. Betzy, whose work I love, has been incredibly supportive throughout the years. She gave me a postcard for the Big Miss Moviola project. It probably took me a moment to send my video in. I was 30 years old.

What interested you about the project?
The Big Miss Moviola postcard I received was seductively cryptic. Even though I am definitely a feminist, I was a bit wary of women-only projects. My main concern being, do they limit their audience from the start? But I liked the spirit of the postcard, it had a punk rock Riot Grrl DIY quality about it.

At the time you participated in Joanie 4 Jackie did you consider yourself a filmmaker? What was your relationship to making movies?
The film I submitted, Goiter Girl, was a student film that I had made. When I participated, I was still figuring out how to continue making films outside of a school environment, struggling to become independent, financially & technically. Being fully in touch with my vision, process and ideas; “perfecting” ones’ craft, would not come until much later for me.

What did you think/feel about the Joanie 4 Jackie at the time? And now, in retrospect?
I didn’t really know that much about the scope of the project. For me, being included was definitely one of those moments of encouragement along the way to not give up on making films, if it’s what you love. Now that I know more about the project, I’m impressed by what it created, an incredible network of encouragement. I also was not fully aware of the open, anti-curatorial aspect of what was included. The importance of the project, this experiment, is just revealing itself.

What institutions, groups, people, publications and movements were inspiring you at the time of your participation in J4J?
Cult films from the sixties and seventies, early internet, zines, Mad Cat Film Festival, Seattle Underground Film Festival, Film Arts Foundation (San Francisco), Jon Moritsugu, Sarah Jacobson, Betzy Bromberg, Suzan Pitt, Cal Arts, comic and graphic novels, Fantagraphics, thrift stores, Dan Clowes, Fiona Smyth, Cindy Sherman, Michelangelo Antonioni, Os Mutantes.

What do you do now – professionally and otherwise? Are you still involved in filmmaking?
I have since finished a couple short films, Elfmädchen and Imum Coeli (bottom of the Sky), and am currently working on 13th Street Division, also a short.

Aufbau, inhalt, stil und umfang unterscheiden sich und bestimmen, https://ghostwritinghilfe.com/ was gelesen wird
« Previous: Ball and Chainletter Next: Perfect 10: The Chainletter »