Where is She Now?

Were you a participant in J4J? Did you send a tape or attend a screening?
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Chainletter Filmmakers:

The Break My Chainletter

Jan (Janet) Tranum, Horror Movie
January 26, 2017

How did you find out about Joanie 4 Jackie and how old were you at the time?
i think i found it in an ad in a magazine. it’s been so long I honestly don’t remember i was just super into making my own films from my mother’s video camera as a kid, but i was 14 at the time the video was made.

What interested you about the project?
I’ve always had a passion for making short films specifically horror movies. So when i saw the opportunity to participate at such a young age, I had to do it!!! Being raised in Mississippi there were not much opportunities like this at the time.

At the time you participated in Joanie 4 Jackie did you consider yourself a filmmaker? What was your relationship to making movies?
I always wanted to be an actor and i started making short films, but I liked directing and coming up with story lines and scripts much more. I had to act in most of my films bc i had limited friends that wanted to be in the movies.

Do you have any specific anecdotes or memories associated with your movie?
Convincing my best friend to let me “safely” hang her from a tree without her dad seeing, which he did. Is a memory I can never forget. She and I still laugh about it to this day.

What did you think/feel about the Joanie 4 Jackie at the time? And now, in retrospect?
I thought it was a very cool idea and I wanted to be a part of it but I didn’t think anything would come of it personally. I didn’t know who Miranda July was at the time but am a HUGE fan of hers. I’ve since found out that we are part of a movement and that we were part of a much bigger thing than i could have even comprehended at the time.

If you attended a screening, can you tell us where and when it was and anything else you remember about it?
I never attended a screening. I lived in Mississippi at the time.

What institutions, groups, people, publications and movements were inspiring you at the time of your participation in J4J?
Feminist movement

What do you do now – professionally and otherwise? Are you still involved in filmmaking?
I am an artist, my main medium is watercolor. I still enjoy making short films with my friends but I haven’t uploaded any. But i’m very interested in really getting back into it. I’ve lived in the south my entire life, waited tables in college towns and have so many ideas and real life stories that i’ve lived that i’ve been working on and i think many women would relate too.

Anything you would like to see on the J4J site?
A link to my art on my Instagram page @jantastic_voyage

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Tex Clark, Radical Act
February 7, 2017

How did you find out about Joanie 4 Jackie and how old were you at the time?
I was 22 and I think Kathleen Hanna (who is in the movie) said I should mail it to Miranda. I did and she put it in her project.

What interested you about the project?
I wanted people to see my movie and I was particularly interested in all the art/music/culture coming out of Olympia at that moment. I was excited to be participating from afar.

At the time you participated in Joanie 4 Jackie did you consider yourself a filmmaker? What was your relationship to making movies?
I was a college student and this was a senior project at Antioch College.

Do you have any specific anecdotes or memories associated with your movie?
Interviewing Tribe 8 at the michigan womyn’s fest was historic and important in that tiny world because it was an inter-generational collision between radical feminist womyn’s folk music and political feminist punk. I was also excited to get the film into the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Film Festival (Outfest) and got to fly out and be a part of that.

What did you think/feel about the Joanie 4 Jackie at the time? And now, in retrospect?
I don’t think I am even now fully aware of the scope and extent of it. I was in one piece of it early on but then I got on to other things and didn’t pay attention. I’m looking forward to learning more about Joanie 4 Jackie and seeing more of the films.

What institutions, groups, people, publications and movements were inspiring you at the time of your participation in J4J?
I was a college student at Antioch College and inspired by the homocore movement, women rocking in local scenes, and what was happening with the attention on the riot grrrl moment. I was watching a lot of documentaries in college about all sorts of topics. A director named Anne Bolin who did a film about scary white supremacists in the midwest called Blood in the Face was very helpful and made me think I could to a documentary.

What do you do now – professionally and otherwise? Are you still involved in filmmaking?
I am a federal public defender in Portland, Oregon. that keeps me very busy and I have toddler twins and so I don’t see many movies, let alone make them. Creatively, I’m still bursting with a love of music as a radio DJ. I’m on KXRY Portland Xray.fm on Wednesday nights at 7pm PST. I play a lot of emerging female musicians mixed in with straight up midwest rocknroll, psychedelic stuff, vintage west african, and music from the early 90s, and whatever else I find interesting. The show is called Circa Rad.

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