Where is She Now?

Were you a participant in J4J? Did you send a tape or attend a screening?
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Chainletter Filmmakers:

The Frozen Chainletter

Cristine Brache, Untitled (A Joe Clark Production)
January 30, 2017

How did you find out about Joanie 4 Jackie and how old were you at the time?
I found out about Big Miss Moviola/J4J through my interest in Miranda July. I don’t remember exactly how I found out about it, however I do remember it was around the time between its transition to Bard. I remember feeling like I had just missed the chance to be a part of the project — because I thought the project ended, and feeling sad about it. I was thrilled when I saw it open again. I was 17 when I found out about it and 21 when I submitted my video.

What interested you about the project?
The idea of connecting with other young creative women in this very unique way fascinated me. Of course also that it came from Miranda July. July’s early work was very influential to me. The prospect felt very intimate and also legitimizing. To have my video included with the project made me feel like I was a part of something and that I was visible.

At the time you participated in Joanie 4 Jackie did you consider yourself a filmmaker? What was your relationship to making movies?
Yes, I started making video art when I was 17. The video included in the Frozen Chainletter was my first attempt, made in 2002. I was in TV production in high school and the teacher was very lax. She used to write me passes to get out of other classes to come work on personal video projects. She would also let me and a handful of others stay after school to use the equipment in the studio so long as we were discreet and didn’t tell anyone. The school wasn’t a very good one but had an excellent production studio for some reason. I learned about video and editing using an analog VTR and avid. Students used to make bootlegs of blockbuster video rentals and I also remember someone had a copy of the R. Kelly piss tape. He was also making bootlegs and selling them to other students. To my knowledge only five or six students out of all the TV production periods used the facilities to make video art.

Do you have any specific anecdotes or memories associated with your movie?
Well, I was a virgin when I made the video. I made it because I wanted to get the attention of my first love, who broke my heart many times and was also making video art at school. The same person who introduced me to Miranda July when I was 15. The video was made at Matheson Hammock Park in Miami, Florida with my friend Maritza. I played a man who is sexually attracted to trees and would masturbate at parks. Maritza, played a park visitor who caught the man masturbating and having sex with a tree. The man runs off and the tree gets upset at the woman for interrupting their lovemaking. The tree becomes violent and chases after the woman, violently killing her. I don’t know that the story can be understood.

What did you think/feel about the Joanie 4 Jackie at the time? And now, in retrospect?
I feel the same way now as I did then. As I mentioned above, it was a very special, intimate thing to be a part of. One that made me feel visible as an artist and legitimate on a minor but very important level.

What institutions, groups, people, publications and movements were inspiring you at the time of your participation in J4J?
It’s hard to remember exactly, pornography mainly, Miranda July, The Breeders, Michael Arcos, David Lynch, the only four or five punks at my school, my very open and generous friends who allowed me to record them and trusted me with their image.

What do you do now – professionally and otherwise? Are you still involved in filmmaking?
I am an artist and writer. I have not stopped working with video since I started.

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Rohesia Hamilton Metcalfe, La Blanchisseuse
February 23, 2016

How did you find out about Joanie 4 Jackie and how old were you at the time?
I don’t remember how I heard about it, but it was probably an email or something online. I’m not sure when that was but I’d have been 50 when I participated.

What interested you about the project?
I’ve always liked projects that get off the ground more by collective enthusiasm and inspiration than by institutional support. Plus, I love Miranda July’s work in general, always.

At the time you participated in Joanie 4 Jackie did you consider yourself a filmmaker? What was your relationship to making movies?
I had begun designing websites at the time but yes, I still considered myself a filmmaker/media artist. My relationship to making movies was one of love.

Do you have any specific anecdotes or memories associated with your movie?
I filmed myself ironing at the Experimental Television Center and there turned the footage into a moving impressionist image of a laundress. Then my friend Tony Moore composed music for it. One of the pieces is called “Man’s Shirt”. That may be the only piece of music called “Man’s Shirt”.

What did you think/feel about the Joanie 4 Jackie at the time? And now, in retrospect?
I was really impressed. Now, I feel grateful to have been part of something that gathered together so much energy from so many people. My hat’s off to all the curators, and especially to Miranda July.

What institutions, groups, people, publications and movements were inspiring you at the time of your participation in J4J?
I was involved with the Filmmakers’ Coop at the time, working with a great group of people on the board — MM Serra, Anne Hanavan, Lynne Sachs, Ghen Dennis, Bill Morrison, Bradley Eros, Marie Losier, John Mhiripiri, Joel Schlemowitz, Grahame Weinbren, Michael Gitlin and Donna Cameron. The collective energy of creative people working together to make more (and unconventional) opportunities for films to be seen was very inspiring.

What do you do now – professionally and otherwise? Are you still involved in filmmaking?
Designing websites has kind of taken over my life, though I do get some sleep.

Anything you would like to see on the J4J site?
I like everything there. I see some films have links to “Watch »” and think it would be great if there were more such links if the works are available online somewhere.

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